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Pedagogy and Praxis

Read my faq before you send me an ask.
Jul 29 '14

hedgehog-goulash7:

preludes-and-prufrock:

awwdish:

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

Reblogging this for my art history class this semester

buwhahaha

The art historian in me had to reblog this.

(Source: cheekygeekymonkey)

Jul 28 '14
toyota:

This gif is the meaning of the word “yas”

You mean like, what, white people make a mockery of black culture?

toyota:

This gif is the meaning of the word “yas”

You mean like, what, white people make a mockery of black culture?

(Source: fileformat)

Jul 28 '14
ds9vgrconfessions:

Follow | Confess | Archive
[In Far Beyond the Stars I didn’t like how Sisko acted like he was the only one being discriminated against. Kira had to stay home on picture day too.]

Let’s talk about this for a moment, can we?
Benny Russell (Sisko) and Kay Eaton/K.C. Hunter (Kira) both had to stay home on picture day to avoid revealing that the company had hired a woman and black man. The episode was not about that particular thing, but rather this was one instance that sets up later events which illustrate just how bad things were for African Americans during that time period. 
The main source of conflict for Russell was when he wrote a masterpiece about the adventures of Captain Benjamin Sisko, a black man. His editor, Douglas Pabst (Odo), tells him the company won’t publish the story as is because the public wouldn’t accept a black man as captain of a space station. Russell has a moment of frustration where he’s unwilling to make the story about another white man, calling the bullshit as he sees it, and then compromising by saying that it was this was all a young black boy’s dream. 
At first it seems like they’re going to publish it, they gave him a quote per word, which was a respectable sum and Russell announced his plan to marry his long-time girlfriend, Cassie (Yates), and buy out the diner. All those plans were crushed when Russell shows up for work one day and finds out that the publisher made a last minute decision to not publish the story. 
That night Russell is intercepted by two cops who get into an argument, but rather than diffuse the situation like cops are “supposed to do”, they decide to teach Russell a lesson and give him a serious beatdown.
Meanwhile, Eaton’s story gets published and nobody says a thing. We can debate nuance and discuss the “what-ifs” and perhaps even meta-narratives about Eaton’s character. Let’s not pretend they’re on the same footing. Yeah, women were not equal citizens, but their experiences were different and distinct from African Americans. White women still had power and privilege over black men. Eaton was still in a better place than Russell despite her socio-political status as a woman.

ds9vgrconfessions:

Follow | Confess | Archive

[In Far Beyond the Stars I didn’t like how Sisko acted like he was the only one being discriminated against. Kira had to stay home on picture day too.]

Let’s talk about this for a moment, can we?

Benny Russell (Sisko) and Kay Eaton/K.C. Hunter (Kira) both had to stay home on picture day to avoid revealing that the company had hired a woman and black man. The episode was not about that particular thing, but rather this was one instance that sets up later events which illustrate just how bad things were for African Americans during that time period. 

The main source of conflict for Russell was when he wrote a masterpiece about the adventures of Captain Benjamin Sisko, a black man. His editor, Douglas Pabst (Odo), tells him the company won’t publish the story as is because the public wouldn’t accept a black man as captain of a space station. Russell has a moment of frustration where he’s unwilling to make the story about another white man, calling the bullshit as he sees it, and then compromising by saying that it was this was all a young black boy’s dream. 

At first it seems like they’re going to publish it, they gave him a quote per word, which was a respectable sum and Russell announced his plan to marry his long-time girlfriend, Cassie (Yates), and buy out the diner. All those plans were crushed when Russell shows up for work one day and finds out that the publisher made a last minute decision to not publish the story. 

That night Russell is intercepted by two cops who get into an argument, but rather than diffuse the situation like cops are “supposed to do”, they decide to teach Russell a lesson and give him a serious beatdown.

Meanwhile, Eaton’s story gets published and nobody says a thing. We can debate nuance and discuss the “what-ifs” and perhaps even meta-narratives about Eaton’s character. Let’s not pretend they’re on the same footing. Yeah, women were not equal citizens, but their experiences were different and distinct from African Americans. White women still had power and privilege over black men. Eaton was still in a better place than Russell despite her socio-political status as a woman.

Jul 28 '14

disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). 

Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). 

To Be Takei documentary official website. 

- Mod Dawes Sr. 

Jul 28 '14

anarcho-animeism:

slaaneshi-party-bus:

Instead of glorifying violence against women, glorify violence against the foul xenos and the lying heretik.

JESUS CHRIST

Jul 28 '14
night-catches-us:

onehalfhipster:

One of my absolute favorite Malcolm X quotes

The Malcom X they don’t show you. 

night-catches-us:

onehalfhipster:

One of my absolute favorite Malcolm X quotes

The Malcom X they don’t show you. 

Jul 28 '14

bestlesbiancave:

butterpaint:

lol

Okay I kinda love this a lot

Jul 28 '14

hugatreeortwo:

… You know, and Asian people and all kind of folks you know, there was no problem with Russians you know, it’s very important that the future be hopeful and that’s what this is.”

Whoopi Goldberg {Sept. 20, 1988} on Star Trek: The Original Series and on why she asked to be in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Jul 28 '14

reikaoki:

imthezombiequeen:

alishalovescats1701:

crimsonclad:

five-boys-with-accents:

Eeyore is just one of those characters that you wanna scoop up and hug forever.

One awesome thing about Eeyore is that even though he is basically clinically depressed, he still gets invited to participate in adventures and shenanigans with all of his friends. And they never expect him to pretend to feel happy, they just love him anyway, and they never leave him behind or ask him to change.

Oh

oh

And he does feel happy, though. He can be happy. He just doesn’t show it as much as the others do.
There was a whole episode about that - Piglet sees him sitting on a hilltop and thinks he’s sadder than usual, and does all he can to cheer him up. Nothing works and the next day he’s back on the hill, and Piglet apologizes because he thinks in trying to help, he just made him sad again and ”I don’t come here when I’m sad. I come up here because I’m happy.”

There’s just something about that…

(Source: galaxieirwin)

Jul 28 '14
leonardmemeoy:

SOMEONE HELP ME I’M SCREAMING AT A SALAD

leonardmemeoy:

SOMEONE HELP ME I’M SCREAMING AT A SALAD